On the Road Again: This Time, at Mom of the Year (Writing About Dad of the Year)


photo credit: Kalexanderson via photopin cc
photo credit: Kalexanderson via photopin cc

Humor is my default.

Self-deprecation isn’t far behind. So when Meredith Spidel of Mom of the Year asked me to write about being Dad of the Year, the stereotypes busted through. Clueless dad. Rule-bender dad. Dad as not much more than the oldest kid dad.

Because it’s all funny, the stereotype.

But there’s a lot of substance in what we fathers do, too. The most difficult subject to write isn’t political or religious. What’s less comfortable than saying nice things – about yourself? I’ll sing my own praises off-key and mouse-quiet. But ask me to show you?

kingI’ll take pride in the proof. And I’ll even go low on word count.

When my daughter offers her money to a sibling who is going out with friends.

When my daughter wakes up early on a sleep-in Saturday to help her mom with another project.

When my daughter breaks ranks and gives me a hand-written note on a hand-drawn picture with a heartfelt quote she found online.

At Meredith’s today, I’ve taken a humorous look at being Dad of the Year. I immediately temper praise with a three-step dose of reality. But when I see my girls among friends or on the pitch or among strangers, with strong souls and hearts, I’m nothing but proud.

Isn’t that funny?

Please come visit me at The Mom of the Year, and check out her posts while you’re there. She’s soon to become a guester here on the DC, too. You’ll love her like I do.

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19 thoughts on “On the Road Again: This Time, at Mom of the Year (Writing About Dad of the Year)”

  1. Eli, I think you’ve got it mastered–both the fun and the heart of being Dad of the Year! Such an honor to have you over at my place. Thanks for hanging out! πŸ™‚

  2. Any man (person) who successfully lets a family member know they are loved and noticed has done an important “dad” (“parent”) thing. The hardest part is knowing whether the child receives what you think you are giving. The note was precious – that kid feels loved.

    1. I hope they know it every day, Shirley. And you’re right, you don’t always get that affirmation that the message is received. Maybe that’s why we have Father’s Day.

      That note was the best gift. Even better than the 2-foot-long T-Rex that roars when you hit a button. (I really did get that).

  3. It might sound funny Eli but you’re the type of Dad I wished I had. I have to thank mine for bringing me into the world and a couple of other things but you are the epitome of a good Dad.

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